outsider — bunnyhopscotch

Reblogged from bunnyhopscotch. Take note, those folks who want to contact me to do work, some basic fundamental professional decency is required. Do not bother if you are not prepared to uphold fairness, justice, equity and respect for persons with disability. Thank you.

I read Sara Luterman’s review of the new HBO series, The Outsider, with interest. The whole kerfuffle over Autistic (mis)representation in the media – from documentary to fantasy – has been stirring and swirling and churning and heaving and whatnot else in that great cauldron perched precariously atop a spitting fire of contention for sometime […]

outsider — bunnyhopscotch

COVID-19 Turning the mobility table #cultureshift

Sharp insights from Sonia Boue. I couldn’t have said this better.

The other side

woman with short grey hair wearing tomatoes collaged onto her glasses and a black eye mask over her moth and nose © Sonia Boué 2020

A blog about access culture shift under COVID-19

So we’re in COVID-19 lockdown.

Many neurodivergent and disabled people are watching you, the abled neuro-majority, with fascination.

We are witnessing a moment that is spectacular and beyond our wildest imaginings. The tragic irony is that it’s taken a lethal pandemic to create the culture shift we need. Accessible work norms are being adopted on a global scale, when many of us have struggled to gain basic access accommodations so much closer to home. That this is so brings a sense of awe, the scale of which (like the pandemic itself) is almost impossible to grasp. For once, we really are all in this together (apart, of course!) Many will want to say, welcome to lockdown! Welcome to our world.

This is the moment to make the usual provisos that not all neurodivergents or disabled people are the…

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access in action

The artistic sphere is nowadays abuzz with terms like “access” and “inclusion”, with all and sundry jumping into the scene laying claim to these trendy words, but how many actually understand what they mean in practice, I wonder? No, I am not talking about the fluffy feel-good pulling-at-heartstrings stuff, or the tired and worn circus-style acts that purport to ‘include’ the disabled but are actually poorly contrived, inexpert displays of awkward disability tokenism. I am looking for concrete, meaningful and practical facilitation of access, and an inclusion that allows persons with disabilities to function from out of their individual optimal realm. Every person has the latter, regardless of what it actually is in shape, size, colour or form, we all each have our own little space, a Clement Space, in which we feel safe and from which we are allowed to emerge wholly ourselves, not broken or wanting to be fixed.

A working trip to the United Kingdom at the end of 2019 perfectly illustrated for me in real-time the essence of true, respectful, creative, meticulous and effective support – that is, dynamic access and inclusion in action.

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